Sunday, March 3, 2024

Six Senses Resorts Made ‘the Greatest Measurable Impact’ Says Its 2022 Sustainability Report

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When it comes to sustainability, luxury hotel and resort brand Six Senses says it walked the walk in 2022, making meaningful and measurable advances to reduce its footprint across its properties.

In its 2022 Sustainability Report, luxury hotel and resort chain Six Senses says the efforts across its nearly two-dozen locations indicate that its industry-leading sustainability vision is “flourishing.”

Six Senses says its efforts are measured across a range of categories at all of its locations. These efforts include energy and water consumption, habitat and endangered species protection and restoration, and vital community and cultural heritage projects. The chain, founded by Sonu Shivdasani, says it allocates funding from each property to support local community projects and environmental efforts.

“We are incredibly proud of the achievements being made by our NGO and community partners on the ground,” Six Senses Vice President of Sustainability Jeff Smith said in a statement. “Each resort has taken on unique projects based on the local need and is aiming for the greatest measurable impact at that destination. And I welcome all our guests to join us in celebrating these projects and partnerships, which are only made possible by guest visits and ongoing support.”

six senses vietnam
Courtesy Six Senses

Last year saw the first Six Senses solarized farm come to the Ninh Van Bay resort in Vietnam where it’s providing electricity and hot water as well as supporting the farm’s organic vegetables. At Six Senses Ibiza the resort produced its own reusable energy, reducing the resort’s emissions by 40 percent and reducing ten Olympic-sized swimming pools worth of water.

Single-use plastic was phased out across the chain last year — an effort that includes extensive research into alternatives.

“The journey began by bottling drinking water (still and sparkling) in reusable glass bottles, saving 1.7 million plastic bottles from circulation in 2022,” the company said in a statement. “Other initiatives include toothpaste made from homegrown aloe vera, homes for hens constructed from bamboo and vines, and natural packaging solutions in kitchens, bathrooms, and from suppliers. Six Senses continues to innovate in the fight against single-use and virgin plastics, kickstarting new and creative solutions, one day, one guest, one story at a time.”

Nearly 34,000 kilograms of trash were collected near all of its locations, a move the chain says improved public waste management for nearly 8,000 locals, and provided clean drinking water to more than 120,000 people while also assisting more than 17,000 people with improved access to medical care.

Its sustainability efforts include Earth Labs — every location has one dedicated to promoting sustainable living. Last year Six Senses upcycled more than 5,000 kilograms of glass into new products via the Earth Labs creating more than 400 kilograms of upcycled products including more than 4,300 candles. The Earth Lab is also a platform for guests and community members to connect with the natural world and better understand the unique efforts at each location.

In Rome, Six Senses first major sustainability project saw the restoration of the façade of the adjacent San Marcello al Corso Church. An important fourth-century baptismal bath was discovered in the basement, which guests can now see through a glass floor next to the Earth Lab.

Punakha
Six Senses Punakha, Bhutan | Courtesy

Across the portfolio, Six Senses says it preserved or restored more than 23,000 square meters of habitat including those protecting seven endangered and four critically endangered species.

Six Senses Con Dao in Vietnam helped endangered green sea turtles, helping more than 6,900 hatchlings make their way to the ocean. Its Laamu location in the Maldives protected 115,000 square meters of seagrass meadows that are home to fish, rays, sharks, and green sea turtles.

At its Ninh Van Bay location in Vietnam, Six Senses has some permanent residents: 153 critically endangered langur monkeys and 42 babies were welcomed last year.

In Europe, Six Senses Ibiza rescued 600 injured hedgehogs as populations decline across the region and Portugal’s Douro Valley location supports a donkey sanctuary and its work with rare Mirandas.

The conservation efforts also extend to trees; its Fiji location restored nearly 8,000 square meters of habitat by planting native plants including 600 mangrove samplings. Every young guest at Six Senses Ninh Van Bay in Vietnam is invited to plant a tree at the resort’s fruit farm.

“Since its beginnings, Six Senses has been a fan of trees, recognizing their importance to wildlife and humans, with several thousand planted (and several more hugged) each year,” the company says.

“Community engagement continues every year at every resort,” says Six Senses, with the company working to provide better access to education and skill training last year to 8,528 students, while also creating 113 jobs outside of the hotels in local communities, and encouraging nearly 10,000 community members to join “positive impact initiatives.”

In Oman, at Six Sense Zighy Bay, the resort is working to support and empower local women as part of the Dibba Women Association.

six sense fiji
Six Senses Fiji | Courtesy

The report launched just ahead of the announcement of the first Six Senses Greece location. Six Senses Megalonisos, which is slated for a 2027 launch, will be located on one of the ten Petalioi islands in the “Greek Maldives,” a short boat ride from Rafina across the mainland from Athens.

“Six Senses Megalonisos offers a unique opportunity to step foot on a Greek island that even the Gods left undiscovered,” Neil Jacobs, CEO of Six Senses, said in a statement. “We look forward to welcoming our guests with emotional hospitality that encompasses pioneering wellness, sustainability, and meaningful experiences.”

George Chryssikos, Chairman and CEO of Grivalia Hospitality says Six Senses and Grivalia share common values in terms of sustainability and well-being. “In Grivalia Hospitality, via our investments, we aim to create special and unique hospitality projects and experiences, while at the same time strengthening Greece’s position as a leading destination for luxury tourism and attracting world-class brands that recognize the great potential of our country in the premium hospitality sector.”

Six Senses says it was chosen for this project — a partnership with Grivalia Hospitality, one of the largest investors in the ultra-luxury hospitality sector in Greece — due in part to its eco-credentials including its efforts across energy, materials, and operations, which support Greece’s recent commitments to sustainable and responsible tourism practices. The resort will be powered by its own solar electric farm.

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